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Best falsies tutorial I’ve ever seen on youtube. 

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Oooh this couch…

Oooh this couch…

(Source: sugarcubebasics, via no-place-like-home)

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jenniferjenkins:

When you’re a public figure, there are rules. Here’s one: A public personality can be black, talented, or arrogant, but he can’t be any more than two of these traits at a time. It’s why antics and soundbites from guys like Brett Favre, Johnny Football and Bryce Harper seem almost hyper-American, capable of capturing the country’s imagination, but black superstars like Richard Sherman, Floyd Mayweather, and Cam Newton are seen as polarizing, as selfish, as glory boys, as distasteful and perhaps offensive.

It’s why we recoil at Kanye West’s rants, like when West, one of the greatest musical minds of our generation, had the audacity to publicly declare himself a genius (was this up for debate?), and partly why, over the six years of Barack Obama’s presidency, a noisy, obstreperous wing of the GOP has seemed perpetually on the cusp of calling him “uppity.” Barry Bonds at his peak was black, talented, and arrogant; he was a problem for America. Joe Louis was black, talented, and at least outwardly humble; he was “a credit to his race, the human race,” as Jimmy Cannon once wrote.

All this is based on the common, very American belief that black males must know their place, and more tellingly, that their place is somewhere different than that of whites. It’s been etched into our cultural fabric that to act as anything but a loud, yet harmless buffoon or an immensely powerful, yet humble servant is overstepping. It’s uppity. It is, as Fox Sports’s Kayla Knapp tweeted last night, petrifying.

— Deadspin on Richard Sherman

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I heart @Ericthomasbtc. Always an inspiration on how to stay focused. Check out his mixtapes. And his youtube channel

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I enjoyed @JeanGreasy’s web series #LifeWithJeannie today. Would love to see more. 

(h/t @forharriet)

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tristanwalker:

never gets old :) // walkerandcompany.com

Love what @tristanwalker is up to! 

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chocolavision:

Model-Slash-Coder Shatters a Dozen Tired Stereotypes

If you have preconceived notions about models being dumb and coders being nerdy white dudes, prepare to abandon them. Lyndsey Scott has modeled for brands like DKNY, Victoria’s Secret, Gucci and Prada. But she also knows Python, Objective C, and iOS, and builds apps in her spare time.

In a profile by Carmel Diamicis on Pando Daily, Scott explains that she graduated from Amherst College in 2006 with a dual-degree in computer science — and 3 years later, found herself modeling for Calvin Klein, as “the first ever African American to get an exclusive contract with the company for New York Fashion Week.”

But up until recently, while modeling, her tech background was kept secret. She tells Diamicis:

The industry makes an effort to reduce the model and, in a way, simplify things. The way they marketed me a lot of times was as younger than I am. They wouldn’t talk about my education, they wouldn’t talk about me… In a way I understand. Youth is valued more than a college education.

One of Scott’s apps — available in the Apple store — is called iPort, and it’s basically a digital portfolio for models. (She tells Business Insider she started coding in middle school!)As seen in this tongue-in-cheek video, Scott is not just smart and beautiful — she’s also got a sense of humor. She also wrote a moving Quora post about going from physically unattractive to physically attractive:

(via awesome-everyday)

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I <3 @kandeejohnson! She has the best energy. <3 

(Source: youtube.com)

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Kinda interesting. 

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How to Ask a Man Out—Without Actually Asking

(Source: youtube.com)